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Migrating (and Open-Sourcing) an Historical Codebase: SVN-to-Git

I have a SVN repo on my local machine that I have been shoving stuff into since before I knew how to use revision control systems properly (I still don't). Each of the directories in my repo represents a separate project. Some of my directories have a proper trunk/branches/tags structure, but most don't. I want to migrate each of my SVN repo's directories into it's own new respective git repo, retaining all historical commits.


[My dodgy SVN repo]
The best tool I have found to do this so-far is svn2git: https://github.com/nirvdrum/svn2git

This tool is a ruby gem that essentially wraps the native git feature for managing svn-to-git migration - git-svn. If you use svn2git's "--verbose" flag, you can see what commands it is issuing to the wrapped tool.

Migrating a dodgy SVN repo to multiple git repos
The reason I decided to blog about my experience was because I had a bit of trouble with the documentation and a bug with the svn2git tool. Mostly the tool is gre…

Should architects write code?

Should architects write code? Much conventional wisdom I'm aware of would suggest that architecture is different from programming, but that architects should definitely write code. For example:

Ward Cunningham's (an original signatory of the Agile Manifesto) wiki: "Architects Dont Code" (as-an Anti Pattern) - http://wiki.c2.com/?ArchitectsDontCode

Simon Brown's blog: "Most software developers are not architects" - http://www.codingthearchitecture.com/2014/02/21/most_software_developers_are_not_architects.html

I did Toastmasters with an interesting character a few years ago. This person had recently left a very successful career in sports management in the USA; they decided they wanted a change in direction. They had completed an MBA with a reputable university and picked up an Enterprise Architect role (responsible for IT integration) with a large public-sector organisation. This person - who I really liked - had no background whatsoever in programming (or…

The art of the professional apology

In my line of business it's often assumed that it's unwise to apologise. The same probably goes for most businesses. To apologise is to admit liability for at least part of a mistake that has been made. As a provider of a professional service, to apolgise is to reveal a vulnerability in the expertise that your customers have come to you for.

Yet a sincere, unlaboured apology can be an important part of the ongoing development of a business relationship. It can also test a relationship. Is the receiving party going to take advantage of the situation and press for discount, raising a volunteered admission of mistake as justification? And in that case, is this the type of customer you really want to be dealing with (if you have a choice)?



[This joker doesn't look particularly sincere - https://medium.com/@laurenholliday_/how-to-write-a-damn-good-apology-8b554513f8eb]

A sincere apology usually takes courage. It can in-fact be viewed as a sign of good judgement. An apology is of…